Flexing it in the other direction results in the wider diameter hyperboloid shown below.

.

hyperboloid_cylinder.jpg

Fig. 285 - Hyperboloid cylinder

hyperboloid_cylinder.jpg

(built with all LT or ST)

◄  flexed outwards

unit cell  ►

dotted line indicates removed strut

click image to enlarge

.

Likewise, variations of the Tri-1 spaceframe whose unit cells were shown in Fig. 234 a) and

d) previously, can be destabilized in a similar fashion to create hyperboloids. 

.

hyperboloid_cylinder.jpg

hyperboloid_cylinder.jpg

hyperboloid_cylinder.gif

click image to enlarge

a) side view

b) top view

c) unit cell

(demonstration model)

dotted line indicates removed strut

Fig. 286 - Hyperboloid cylinder  (built with all IT)

 

click image to enlarge

a)  side view

b) unit cell

Fig. 288 - Cooling tower

Fig. 287 - Hyperboloid cylinder  (built with all RT)

 

.

The hyperboloid cylinder design is commonly used for cooling towers.  The narrowed

midsection of the tower creates a Venturi effect of low pressure that draws air into the

base.  There the air mixes with waste steam that cools as it rises to the top.

.

If the Tri-1 spaceframe is further destabilized by removing another strut from

hyperboloid_cylinder.gif

its unit cell, the hyperboloid cylinder built from it can turn itself inside/out.

That is, the inside of the cylinder becomes the outside and vice versa.  In the

process it is transformed into a flat disc whose center rises up to form the

walls of the cylinder before collapsing back into the disc shape again.

 

Fig. 289 - Tri-1 unit cell with two struts removed  (dotted lines) 

 

.

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Page 152 - Building stability - Hyperboloid cylinders

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